Posts Tagged ‘lighting designers UK’

Lighting Design Awards 2019

Fabulous Lighting Design Enhancing Beautiful Buildings

I’ve just spent an indulgent hour looking through my beautiful glossy Lighting Magazine Special Issue for the Lighting Design Awards 2019. So much that is beautiful, so much that is now linear.

What struck me most of all is the indelible fact that neither architecture or lighting stand on their own but are intrinsically entwined. A beautiful building can be enhanced by taking advantage of natural light or by the addition of clever and artistic artificial illumination. And whilst a dull building can be enhanced by beautiful lighting the full panoramic beauty of perfect lighting design only comes to the fore when the quality of architecture and lighting are brought together in perfect harmony.

And that’s what these awards illustrated. Here are a few of my favourites.

Hotel Project of the Year – Winner – Muh Shoou Xixi Hotel

Ethereal and delicate. Wonderful use of linear lighting where the magic of the night is retained and the lighting would complement a full moon. Lighting design by Prolighting

Integration Project of the Year – Shanghai Sunac Sales Center

Where would the building be without the lighting?  How could this fabulous lighting design have been created without this stunning building?  Design by Bradston Partnership

Retail Project of the Year – T2 Luxury Mall, Melbourne Airport, Australia

Reminds me of origami – perfectly folded. Perfectly lit. Lighting design by Electrolight

Heritage Project of the Year – International Presbyterian Church, Ealing, UK

Soft linear lighting combined with the rhythm of conical uplights accentuating the fabulous shape. Lighting design by 18 Degrees

NB There were many other fabulous designs. For further information visit Lighting Design Awards


Designer Lighting: Is it Diminished by Over-Exposure?

Designer Lighting

Scenario: You’ve just spent £600 on a designer pendant light for your new-build home and then you walk into your local McDonalds and see it hanging just near the stand for the ketchup and straws. How do you feel?  Luckily I hadn’t just bought such a designer light and I hadn’t specified the light for a client but I did walk into the local takeaway to see this very much admired designer piece on full display and somehow, well, it just doesn’t feel the same any more.

So why do we buy designer items? Is it the form, the cut, the ergonomics?  Or is it the exclusivity which is usually linked to the cost?  In other words the pricier the item the more exclusive, ie fewer people can afford it so therefore seen less.  But then large chain outlets will have big clout – they’ll be buying in quantity and, if rolling out the same design throughout the country, will undoubtedly be placing substantial orders with the producers which means that they can specify lighting without being overly concerned with the cost.  But is it short-sighted of the design houses to supply to large chain outlets and does it ultimately have a negative impact on the way their products are perceived?

Above are some snapshots of designer lights that I have encountered on the high street. I love all these light fittings and I’m not here to name and shame any of them as they enhance our shopping and eating experience but to be honest I would think twice before specifying them for a client, or I would at least warn them!

What do you think?