Posts Tagged ‘lighting designer’

Christopher Hyde Lighting – British Classical Lighting

British Classical Lighting

Christopher Hyde Lighting was founded in 1995 and produces quintessentially English lighting, perfectly suited to classical homes, although they do now design and manufacture some transitional contemporary lighting as well. They have a factory in Milton Keynes and altogether employ the skills of some 60 – 80 artisans at any one time.

One of their main strengths is the amount of customised light fittings they can produce – various metal finishes, coloured flex cables and bespoke lampshades which attracts owners of larger properties, hotels and yachts.

Christopher Hyde have an online website and a showroom in Chelsea Design Centre, London.

www.christopherhyde.com

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Lighting Predictions for 2020

What Changes in Lighting will 2020 bring?

Lighting has changed enormously over the past decade. What direction will it take in 2020? Here are a few of my predictions.

More Environmental Concerns

Let’s face it – the average LED downlight may be cutting down on the amount of electricity used but what about the environment impact of the actual fitting?  Cheaper dedicated LED downlights may stipulate a life of 40,000 hours as opposed to higher spec fittings which can last around 70,000 hours. Lower quality LEDs can often fail early, well short of their predicted life span. Then what happens to them?  They get chucked or recycled. The more expensive fittings will usually have better quality components so will last longer and are kinder on the environment.

The good news is we are moving towards legislation (in the EU, at least) that will ensure that the individual components of luminaires should be easily changed without damaging the rest of the fitting. Have you ever seen the size of an actual LED? Literally millimetres; so it seems madness to throw away a whole downlight when, in theory the LED, or the driver, could be replaced.

I’ve used LEDs from my favourite suppliers that I installed fifteen years ago – when LEDs were just coming into mainstream use. They were not cheap at the time but they are still going strong.  Ultimately you get what you pay for, within reason. This not only impacts your pocket but the environment.

Linear LED Lighting

This is hugely on the increase – either recessed, built within shadow gaps of a new construction, or integrated into profiles, cornicing, or furniture. Linear lighting is here to stay. It’s energy efficient, to a certain extent although if you add up the wattage on the most powerful versions, the energy consumption tots up.

And a word to the wise: the brightest, most powerful is not always the best choice. Sometimes it can be a struggle to find the most subtle for discreet areas when the last thing you want is to throw the balance of the lighting out of kilter.

Light Pollution

More consideration is now being given to light pollution. Personally I think that, when it comes to planning permission, more thought should be given to the impact of any external lighting on the neighbourhood and wildlife.

Health and Light

There is now a greater awareness of the connection between health and light. Whilst natural light is always the best option, lighting designers of hospitals and factories are now designing systems that will modify the lighting intensity, colour and frequency as the day progresses. This not only helps keep our biological clocks in line but can also have an effect on productivity and mental health, even dementia.

Looking forward

Light & Build Show at Frankfurt  – 8th – 13th March 2020

Euroshop in Dusseldorf, Germany – 16th – 20th February 2020

 


Lighting Design Awards 2019

Some of the best inspiration comes from seeing what award winning lighting designers are currently doing. Here are my favourites from the Lighting Design Awards 2019


Lighting a long hallway

How to Light a Hallway

How do I light my hallway?

A question that is often asked when planning lighting for the renovation of a home or a new-build project.  For a relatively small percentage of a house this area will have a great impact on the feel and flow of a building.

I start by looking at a lighting project as a journey.  It may help to literally close your eyes and imagine opening the front door.  What are you greeted by?  What is the feeling you want to create?

Analysing the following points can help you get it right.

Main Entrance Hallway

Is this the main entrance to your home that your visitors will see first or is it a transitional space or back hallway?  Is it situated on the ground floor with ample natural light or in a dark basement?

Think of how the space is being used.  It’s often useful to have a console table which allows for a surface for placing necessities, perhaps with a mirror above for checking the tilt of your hat before leaving the house.  If the space is large enough a lamp or two can work well to soften the area; if the hallway is tight then a wall light, or two wall lights either side of a mirror can help to lower the lighting to create warmth.

 

Lighting a classical hallway

Proportions

How high is the ceiling in proportion to the length and width of the space? What greets you at the end?  Over a decade ago I did the hallway (left picture) in a basement leading to a playroom/teenagers’ den. Would I do it differently today? Absolutely!

These days we have some wonderful LED profiles which can either be incorporated into a shadow gap or could be placed centrally to cast light on one or both walls. The downlights were not the ones I specified and should have had wide beams to create an even flow of light on the wall.

What I wouldn’t change is having some focus on the blank wall ahead.  Here we put a Large Button wall light by Flos  as this picked up on the theme of a further row of buttons in the den.  The wall lights are the Pochette also by Flos

The corridor on the right was a lower ground floor area which would be used for parking bicycles and surfboards so had to be robust and serviceable.  There wasn’t any void in the ceiling above so we created boxing to accommodate downlights on one side and exterior bulkhead wall lights on the other which could withstand being knocked a bit. (Unfortunately these are only snapshots and were taken when my clients were moving in so a huge amount of stuff was lined along one side of the space.)

Artwork and Artifacts

These bring individuality and personality into a space and lighting can be incorporated in a display area if there is enough depth.  Light can be washed onto paintings or family pictures which in turn will bounce light back into the hallway and this can be done either with angled downlights or picture lights which can be very slim an unobtrusive these days.  For the best contemporary picture lights that I know visit Hogarth Lighting. They supply a fabulous array of picture lights and will even tweak the tone of light to compliment your painting.

Floor and Wall Surface

Do you know the finish and colour of your flooring and walls?  This will have an impact on how much light will reflect within the area.  For example, if you place inground LEDs to wash up a wall this will have a much greater effect if the surface is textured and a light colour.

Niches and Recesses

These can add a depth to the space and can often be factored into the build if the project is a self-build or a major renovation.  Lighting can be incorporated into these areas to illuminate objects or can simply be architectural features that can bounce slots of light back into the hallway.

Above all it is important to make the hallway personal and although it can be useful to look at magazines and Instagram always remember that this space is your own and should feel like Home.

 

 

 

 


Lighting Designer or Lighting Consultant

What’s the difference between a Lighting Designer and a Lighting Consultant

Your new-build project is progressing and you turn your mind to designing a lighting scheme. Who do you contract to do this work – a lighting designer or a lighting consultant?  Here is a bit more background information.

Lighting Designer – Product Design

A Lighting Designer can be someone who designs the architectural light fittings and the luminaires that we include in our projects. For example Tom Dixon who has a wide range of his own lights as well as other products he designs, Marc Sadler who has designed several renowned luminaires including Foscarini’s Jamaica and of course our own Tom Raffield who creates beautiful bentwood fittings  such as the Butterfly.

These lighting designers concentrate on product design and therefore their speciality is not designing lighting schemes.

Lighting Designers – Theatrical

Lighting Designers can also be specialists in theatrical lighting including opera and rock musical shows. These designers think big and bold and you can’t get much more impressive than Patrick Woodroffe and Adam Bassett http://woodroffebassett.com who made a lasting impact at the London Olympics and continue lighting rock concerts and classical productions throughout the world.  Other notable theatrical lighting designers are Mark Henderson and Paule Constable to name a few.

Excellent lighting in theatrical productions is absolutely critical – get it wrong and the whole event is lacklustre and dreary no matter how impressive the production itself.

Architectural Lighting Designers

These are designers who primarily design larger projects such as offices, museums, shops, hotels, restaurants and larger residential complexes. For example Stanton Williams who recently carried out the lighting for Musée d’arts in Nantes and Maurice Brill Lighting Design who have done a plethora of international projects such as the Lanesborough Hotel in London and the Gritti Palace in Venice.

These types of lighting designers are very high end and any residential projects taken on would be exceptional as their work schedule is primarily taken up with the larger design jobs.  All lighting designs would closely co-ordinate with other design mediums using BIM and their specialism is design only, not supply.

There are other types of lighting designers who concentrate more on residential lighting and generally work on the premise that they will design the lighting with the assumption that they will also supply the fittings. John Cullen Lighting for example have some of their own products manufactured to their specifications but also supply architectural lights from other suppliers to which they allocate their own codes.  Although this means that ordering is relatively easy it also gives less flexibility for the client if the electrical contractor wants to supply direct from the manufacturer.

At Luxplan we work more as Lighting Consultants as we don’t supply the fittings and all our schemes are produced with full transparency so that clients can purchase the products themselves. However, we will also call ourselves lighting designers as that is the most general term used.

 


Designer Lighting: Is it Diminished by Over-Exposure?

Designer Lighting

Scenario: You’ve just spent £600 on a designer pendant light for your new-build home and then you walk into your local McDonalds and see it hanging just near the stand for the ketchup and straws. How do you feel?  Luckily I hadn’t just bought such a designer light and I hadn’t specified the light for a client but I did walk into the local takeaway to see this very much admired designer piece on full display and somehow, well, it just doesn’t feel the same any more.

So why do we buy designer items? Is it the form, the cut, the ergonomics?  Or is it the exclusivity which is usually linked to the cost?  In other words the pricier the item the more exclusive, ie fewer people can afford it so therefore seen less.  But then large chain outlets will have big clout – they’ll be buying in quantity and, if rolling out the same design throughout the country, will undoubtedly be placing substantial orders with the producers which means that they can specify lighting without being overly concerned with the cost.  But is it short-sighted of the design houses to supply to large chain outlets and does it ultimately have a negative impact on the way their products are perceived?

Above are some snapshots of designer lights that I have encountered on the high street. I love all these light fittings and I’m not here to name and shame any of them as they enhance our shopping and eating experience but to be honest I would think twice before specifying them for a client, or I would at least warn them!

What do you think?